Unsung heroes of Koha 34 – David Nind

David Nind is one of a kind. Neither he nor the organisation he works for use Koha, but he has been active in the community for many many years. He helps with maintaining the wiki, running the twitter account, answering many many emails on the mailing list, attending user groups and so much more. The work he does has been incredibly valuable and is a major part of the success of Koha.

So thank you very much David

 

Patu to the face as a service – Testimonials

PTTF

I was just talking about 3000 year old Welsh skulls and Māori not being tangata whenua and bam,  patu right in my face.  Had to stop, and go down to the A&E

  • Noel – a Historian (no really, you can just say you’re a historian and the Herald will print any drivel you make up)

As I was being consistently wrong about everything, as I am wont to do, I heard a mighty yell of ‘D haaa’ and smack, patu on the point of the jaw. Shut me right up I must say.

  • Alan – Author (sort of, he had one ok book but the rest are all pretty crap)

We were performing our ‘Haka’ to advertise insurance, when someone came running up, and screamed ‘Ana tō kai, kai toa’ and hit the head of marketing in the face with some sort of club thing.

  • Spokesperson for ARAG insurance

I don’t know what happened, one minute I was saying “muesli bars have too much sugar in them for growing bodies” and the next minute, tewhatewha upside the head. Well I never!

  • Judgey McJudgerson – Kindy parent/teacher

Look as the enlightened feminist I am I was just commenting on how ‘ethnic’ women are more attractive if they don’t look ‘ethnic’. Then crack, taiaha to the temple. I said don’t hit me I love women and what about fat yoga… and then pow, wahaika in the waha.

  • Someone whose core is super soft

He’s just three …

  • The “journalist” couldn’t finish this statement as he was promptly hit 16 times with a mere

Unsung heroes of Koha 33 – Joy Nelson

Not only does Joy describe Bibframe by using the ontology of Tutu, but she probably currently knows the most about data migrations to Koha. This would be neat in itself, but she never hesitates to share this knowledge by answering questions on the mailing lists, attending and speaking at Kohacons, and participating on IRC.
Joy is a person of great integrity and she brings that to her work on Koha. The community and the project are lucky to have her.

Unsung heroes of Koha 32 – Josef Moravec

I have never met Josef, but according to git it has been 685 days since his first patch was accepted into the Koha code base. He now has 42 patches with a total of nearly 3000 lines changed, which in itself is a great achievement. But even more importantly, Josef is a committed tester. He is currently leading the number of sign offs for April, and is second only to Marc Véron (unsung hero number 31) in terms of sign offs for 2017.
Jo Ransom met Josef in the Czech Republic while on her Koha world tour and speaks highly of him. If I have this correctly he works for a University that has been using Koha for quite a few years now. It is so great to see users becoming contributors also.

Děkuji Josef

Pae Tīhau Māori

I was reading this excellent post by Carrie Stoddart-Smith (which I discovered via Twitter) and it got me thinking about how I use Twitter itself. If you are a New Zealand Twitter user you have probably bumped into someone using the word Twitterati.  This is usually used as a insult, often in conjunction with equally prejorative phrases like ‘hive mind’ etc. Now while the Twitterati don’t exist (it’s pretty much just a group of friends acting like friends) there certainly are subgroups of NZ Twitter out there.

One of my favourite of these is what I am calling Pae Tīhau Māori, or the Māori twitterverse. I think a major characteristic of it is whanaungatanga (this is how I got to here from Carrie’s post). A lot of what I see is awhi, and whakawhanaungatanga. People helping and encouraging each other, and people making connections with each other.

One recent example of this whakawhanautanga happened with me just last week. While I was in India, reading twitter over breakfast, I noticed this Twitter exchange with my Dad.

 

Now this jogged my memory, Nanny Ada Davis fed me my first solid meal (which I don’t remember) but I remember being told, and I remembered the photos of me with her. So I posted.

Which after this

And a few more tweets lead to me emailing Phoebe a bunch of photos, for her to share with her whānau. Connections had been reestablished. Then there are things like this

And many many more (please hit me up with any examples you like if you wish). In general and with very few exceptions, I see Māori on twitter helping, uplifting, and connecting with each other. There are discussions, but I am struggling to think of one that wasn’t done out of a genuine desire to learn/discuss, rather than to attack. I am sure there are some acrimonious ones, but I am happy to hang out in my ‘bubble’ it’s a much nicer place to hang out than lots of the internet. Long may it continue. Mauri ora tātou