Unsung heroes of Koha 34 – David Nind

David Nind is one of a kind. Neither he nor the organisation he works for use Koha, but he has been active in the community for many many years. He helps with maintaining the wiki, running the twitter account, answering many many emails on the mailing list, attending user groups and so much more. The work he does has been incredibly valuable and is a major part of the success of Koha.

So thank you very much David

 

Unsung heroes of Koha 33 – Joy Nelson

Not only does Joy describe Bibframe by using the ontology of Tutu, but she probably currently knows the most about data migrations to Koha. This would be neat in itself, but she never hesitates to share this knowledge by answering questions on the mailing lists, attending and speaking at Kohacons, and participating on IRC.
Joy is a person of great integrity and she brings that to her work on Koha. The community and the project are lucky to have her.

Unsung heroes of Koha 32 – Josef Moravec

I have never met Josef, but according to git it has been 685 days since his first patch was accepted into the Koha code base. He now has 42 patches with a total of nearly 3000 lines changed, which in itself is a great achievement. But even more importantly, Josef is a committed tester. He is currently leading the number of sign offs for April, and is second only to Marc Véron (unsung hero number 31) in terms of sign offs for 2017.
Jo Ransom met Josef in the Czech Republic while on her Koha world tour and speaks highly of him. If I have this correctly he works for a University that has been using Koha for quite a few years now. It is so great to see users becoming contributors also.

Děkuji Josef

Help an artist out

As most of you will know I have been working on Koha since 1999. Most of you will also know that without others at the beginning like Rachel, Simon, Olwen, Rosalie and Jo Koha would simply not exist. What people people might not be aware of though is that the one person who has been with me throughout the whole 18 years, that Koha has been worked on, is my wife Laurel.
She wasn’t my wife when I started in fact we had only recently met. But the stories of my Koha journey are intertwined with my relationship with Laurel. Without her constant support I would have given up a long time ago. A few years ago I wrote an unsung heroes of Koha post about Laurel.
Without her support I would never have been to travel the places I have, do the work on Koha I do in the weekends and evenings and so much more.
All of this is a long lead in to say that now Laurel needs your help (only if you are in a position where you can of course). Laurel is an art educator and an artist. Neither of which, unless you are incredibly fortunate, are careers that provide much in the way of financial rewards.
Laurel has battled a lot of health problems throughout her life and her art is one way she deals with it. She is currently working on 2 shows to exhibit
And is currently fundraising to cover a small part of the costs. We’d love to be able to cover the costs ourselves but unfortunately we can’t. So if you want to help Laurel out (and be part of making some fantastic art) which indirectly helps me out, which indirectly helps Koha out, please do. And if you don’t we’re still friends 🙂

Boosted fundraising site

Kohacon16 Day 3 – Working towards a Koha Greek Users’ Group

Sofia Zapounidou followed Georgia’s talk, Georgia had made a fantastic case for the need for people to collaborate. So Sofia followed it up with the how this might happen.

2016-06-01 15.26.26

They looked at the other local user groups around the world and what they did. Then they tried to find out what other libraries in Greece are using Koha, there are much more than people know about. They did a survey of these libraries to find out what people wanted to do

  • Website/Wiki
  • Mailing list
  • Translation of Koha
  • Training
  • Desired features
  • Coding initiatives

Greece is ready for a Koha users group

Kohacon16 Day 3 – 10 years of Koha in Greece: from solitude to solidarity?

Georgia Katsarou then spoke about the history of Koha usage in Greece. She started by introducing where she works, a library in a school called College Year in Athens.

They started with a card catalogue, and then moved to Access (the students like the card catalogue much better). In 2006 they moved to Koha.

Greek Timeline
  • 2006-2007 Quiet
  • 2008 A few libraries started asking about Koha
  • 2009 More libraries, HEAL-links ebooks.
  • December 2009 First presentation at a Greek Conference
  • 2010-2015 Interest of every kind of library
  • 2016 Kohacon in Thessaloniki

Georgia felt that she need to give back, her boss said ok. So she started by translating and ran a blog called KohaGR.

What we must do
  • Communicate
  • Spread the news
  • Have a virtual space
  • Ask/Answer/Discuss
  • Meet with each other
  • Have an annual meeting
  • Volunteer
  • Public and private work together
  • Companies must not be afraid to contribute
  • Help those who are in need (libraries with no IT, unimarc users)
  • Work together on projects
  • Ask for help and ideas from other local communities
What not to do
  • Exchange questions, ideas and solutions privately!!!
  • Set up our installation and forget about it
  • Take for granted other people’s contribution

Georgia presented so well and so passionately, that I feel really invigorated and ready to go on the hackfest.